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Mirror of Ambrose - TL;DR?
James Enge

jamesenge
Date: 2012-08-01 13:35
Subject: TL;DR?
Security: Public
Rene Sears interviewed me for today's edition of the Pyr newsletter, Pyr-A-Zine, in which I sound off on political systems in fantasy, history (true or feigned), what is and is not a trilogy, and the proper way to eat a sandwich through your nose. (Well, everything except that last part.)
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renesears: ghost
User: renesears
Date: 2012-08-01 18:26 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:ghost
Well, now I know what I'm asking next time.
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jamesenge
User: jamesenge
Date: 2012-08-15 08:09 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I had a snappy answer for that... but I guess you'll have to take my word for it.
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Chris MacLee: weber dobro
User: lonesomenumber1
Date: 2012-08-01 21:08 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:weber dobro
I was about to say, Ms. Sears didn't even ask you about the proper way to eat a sandwich though your nose. But I see she plans to remedy that next interview.

Amazon informed me yesterday that my copy of A Guile of Dragons will be here August 6th rather than August 28th, which will give me a good excuse to put down this history of concrete I'm reading. No, I'm not making that up. Actually, given your day job, Concrete Planet might be right up your alley.
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jamesenge
User: jamesenge
Date: 2012-08-15 08:10 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
History of concrete actually sounds pretty interesting. Thanks for the link!
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marycatelli
User: marycatelli
Date: 2012-08-01 23:30 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Very traditional, an anarchy. The Shire is one.
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jamesenge
User: jamesenge
Date: 2012-08-15 08:11 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Pretty close, anyway--offices like the Shiriffs and the mayor seem to be only vestigial traces of government.

This is a pretty Tolkienian book in lots of ways (though there aren't any hobbits) (or elves).
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Sarah Avery
User: dr_pretentious
Date: 2012-08-16 04:52 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
That interview made me wonder if you had Le Guin's The Dispossessed in mind. It's been my favorite exploration of anarchy and community so far. I wonder if I'll find anything of Anarres in the Wardlands.

I just picked up my copy of A Guile of Dragons. How will I go to sleep, knowing that book is in my house and I'm not reading it?
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jamesenge
User: jamesenge
Date: 2012-08-17 08:20 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Yes, that was definitely one of the things that was in my mind as I wrote. (And its prequel, "The Day Before the Revolution".) The more I learn about ancient civilization, the less I'm convinced that "custom" would be an advance on written law--it's always been the other way around. But UKL confronts boldly many of the key issues that would have to be resolved if an anarchy were to work, even as a plausible mental experiment.

Plus it's a marvelous novel of particular people and intellectual adventure. There haven't been many novels that good in the history of sf/f... and Le Guin wrote most of the others.

I'm afraid GUILE isn't in that league--just adventure fantasy. But I hope it doesn't disappoint.
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